One billion African youths in need of education by 2050

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One billion African youths in need of education by 2050

If the current trends continue, by 2030 only one in ten youths will be on track to gain fundamental secondary-level skills in developing nations, majority of which are in Africa.

For the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) of ensuring quality education for all to be achieved by 2030, African leaders’ commitment must be in line with the support from the international community, potentially through an International Finance Facility for Education (IFFEd). However, the international community is lacking in this area, especially in terms of financing.

While many developing nations have deepened their commitment to enhance the education sector, it is still an area that remains persistently underfinanced, with funding levels falling below the requirement needed to attain education benchmarks. Since 2002, education’s share of official development assistance (ODA) has in fact declined from 13 percent to 10 percent.

The Education Commission’s Learning Generation report reflects some critical challenges, particularly for African nations with long-standing education inadequacies. By 2050, Africa will be home to a billion youths. However, if the current trends continue, by 2030 only one in ten youths will be on track to gain fundamental secondary-level skills in developing nations, majority of which are in Africa.

The outcome can be deterred, and to expedite these objectives, the Education Commission has proposed developing countries to comply in heightening their domestic public expenditure on education from an average 4 percent to 5.8 percent of GDP by 2030, while executing measures that ensure the efficient use of resources. At the same time, the international community would increase its funding over this period from about $16 billion to approximately $90 billion per year; while providing coordination measures to ensure the most efficient use of funds.

The IFFEd is an initiative carried out to ensure that the next generation receives education. To advance IFFEd, there is a need to identify countries that recognise its existence, and be willing to work towards achieving the benefits offered. Many African leaders are committed to the levels of education investment and reform needed to qualify for IFFEd assistance, and recognise that the change was much needed and long overdue. However, now the challenge is to realise these said objectives and commitments. Only by doing so, can all children be in school within a generation.

Source: WE Forum

Therefore, to advance excellence in education, particularly in higher education within the Middle East and Africa region; higher education professionals are highly encouraged to participate in the upcoming QS MAPLE 2018 – an annual strategic summit attended by academics alike from across the world who are committed in making a positive impact to the global higher education sector.

QS MAPLE 2018 will be held from 4-6 March 2018 in Manama, Bahrain, themed “Advancement of University Excellence in all its Forms”.