Number of youngsters intending to go to university tumbles to lowest in eight years

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College students listening to a university lecture

The extent of youngsters who think they are probably going to go to university is at its most reduced level in years, new figures indicate, with many referring to cost as an essential concern.

As indicated by a report, the possibility of going ahead to higher education has turned out to be less alluring for some youngsters.

Reacting to the yearly Sutton Trust poll – which addressed more than 2,600 11 to 16-year-olds in England and Wales – around one out of every seven (14%) said they were probably not going to go ahead with higher education.

74% of students who participated in the survey said they were likely to go ahead to higher education, down from a high of 81% out of 2013. While very nearly 10 years back 8% thought it was improbable they would go ahead with higher education, that figure rose to 14% this year.

More importantly, the survey also shows that the extent of students from “low income” family who are likely to go ahead to university has tumbled to an unsurpassed low of 61%.
The extent of youngsters who think they are probably going to go to university is at its most reduced level in years, new figures indicate, with many referring to cost as an essential concern.

As indicated by a report, the possibility of going ahead to higher education has turned out to be less alluring for some youngsters.

Reacting to the yearly Sutton Trust poll – which addressed more than 2,600 11 to 16-year-olds in England and Wales – around one out of every seven (14%) said they were probably not going to go ahead with higher education.

74% of students who participated in the survey said they were likely to go ahead to higher education, down from a high of 81% out of 2013. While very nearly 10 years back 8% thought it was improbable they would go ahead with higher education, that figure rose to 14% this year.

More importantly, the survey also shows that the extent of students from “low income” family who are likely to go ahead to university has tumbled to an unsurpassed low of 61%.

In general, a third (33%) of students surveyed said that they were “likely” to go ahead to higher education and 41% said it was “genuinely likely” they would do as such. Half of the individuals who said they were probably going to go ahead with higher education were worried about the cost of higher education (51%), up from 46% a year ago.

Of the individuals who said they were probably not going to go, 7 out of every 10 said they didn’t care for the thought, or did not appreciate studying, while about two-thirds (64%) had monetary issues – need to begin earning money at the earliest opportunity such as due to debt concerns.

More than two in five (44%) thought they were not smart enough, or would not get good results, while a comparative extent (42%) did not think they would require a degree for the employments they were thinking about.

28% of respondents referred to social reasons as not having any desire to go.

In general, a third (33%) of students surveyed said that they were “likely” to go ahead to higher education and 41% said it was “genuinely likely” they would do as such. Half of the individuals who said they were probably going to go ahead with higher education were worried about the cost of higher education (51%), up from 46% a year ago.

Of the individuals who said they were probably not going to go, 7 out of every 10 said they didn’t care for the thought, or did not appreciate studying, while about two-thirds (64%) had monetary issues – need to begin earning money at the earliest opportunity such as due to debt concerns.

More than two in five (44%) thought they were not smart enough, or would not get good results, while a comparative extent (42%) did not think they would require a degree for the employments they were thinking about.

28% of respondents referred to social reasons as not having any desire to go.