University 4.0: Meeting the demands of Fourth Industrial Revolution

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University 4.0: Meeting the demands of Fourth Industrial Revolution
Photo from Forbes.com

 

University 4.0: Meeting the demands of Fourth Industrial Revolution

Although there have been discussions on student-centred learning, learning outcomes, lifelong learning and use of ICT in education, the education sector, particularly higher education, are still relying on outmoded approaches to facilitate learning.

Technological advancements are altering the global landscape, and the education sector, particularly higher education are facing challenges in preparing students for the fourth industrial revolution. These are a few common questions educators across the world yet to have answers for:

  • How do we educate for the fourth industrial revolution?
  • Are our education systems and programmes relevant to the fourth industrial revolution?
  • How do we reconstruct our education systems so that they are relevant?

The fourth industrial revolution is said to be characterised by the technologies integration and blurring of lines between physical, digital and biological aspects of life. These technologies are foreseen to have a substantial influence over our work, social and cultural environments. There is also a need to ensure that everyone can continue to learn, adapt and apply relevant technologies to the dynamic learning and work environment, and re-adjust to cultural, economic, political and social advancements. However, our social infrastructure has failed to be quick in adapting to the technological advances and their influence on our work and social life.

Although there have been discussions on student-centred learning, learning outcomes, lifelong learning and use of ICT in education, the education sector, particularly higher education, are still relying on outmoded approaches to facilitate learning. Curricula and programmes are hardly in line with the industry demands and present social life.

With the massification of education worldwide, the design of both traditional and present education systems failed to warrant access to quality, relevant education for everyone, not just the younger generation. Therefore, it is essential to re-work the present education systems to create an adaptable and flexible system that promotes educating for the fourth industrial revolution and beyond. It is important to focus on ICT and future technologies, teacher education and lifelong learning for an adaptable and flexible education system.

With conversations about the challenges brought about by the fourth industrial revolution being under way, the higher education community will have to start an imperative conversation and debate about how to reshape the education system into an adaptable, flexible and relevant social environment. An environment that allows the entire community across the world to pursue lifelong learning and gain the necessary skills and competencies to survive and contribute to a progressive society across different industrial revolutions.

Source: University World News

Participate in the upcoming QS WorldClass 2018 seminar, held from 16-18 April 2018 in Abu Dhabi, themed “Changes in University/Industry Interaction”.