Women Empowerment: Katherine Graham and ‘The Post’

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Women Empowerment: Katherine Graham and ‘The Post’
Katharine Graham at her Washington Post desk (detail) by Diana Walker / Color photograph, 1993 / National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution

Be Inspired.

“The thing women must do to rise to power is to redefine their femininity. Once, power was considered a masculine attribute. In fact, power has no sex” – Katherine Graham

Women Empowerment: Katherine Graham and ‘The Post’

Katherine Graham was an American publisher of The Washington Post, overseeing its most acclaimed period: the Watergate coverage that led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon thereafter. Graham was by then an icon before stepping down from her role after more than two decades; and passed away in 2001.

At present, the new movie “The post” is set to inspire a new generation of women – and girls – who are hopefully captivated enough to be in search for her Pulitzer Prize-winning autobiography “Personal History”. The autobiography narrates the story of an insecure widow who attained control of a newspaper and rose to meet challenges beyond her expectation, making significant impact along the way.

Graham is a classic representation of many other working women in today’s society. “The Post” – is a movie about a woman finding her voice. It demonstrates what it feels like to be the only women in a boardroom or who have fought to affirm their place in roles traditionally occupied by men. Until now, few women are in authority regardless of the industry, and they still find difficulty in speaking their truths and have their voices heard. However, this is changing significantly.

At the end of the “The Post”, Graham leaves the Supreme court, maneuvers through a crowd of young women in awe for the woman who plucked up the courage to take up a big fight and gained victory. While the legitimacy of the scene is questionable, but the metaphor of it is on point and could not be more timely.

Source: Washington Post